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Many not coping well with Crohn's

One in five Irish people living with Crohn’s disease is coping poorly or very poorly, according to the findings of a new research study conducted by the website Crohnscolitis.ie.

More than 15,000 people in Ireland are affected by Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis. These conditions are collectively known as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). For people with IBD, their digestive system is impaired and the gut becomes inflamed and swollen. People are most likely to develop Crohn’s disease in their late teens or early 20s.

The new research findings on Crohn’s were announced in conjunction with the launch of a major new patient education programme entitled ‘Life and IBD’, developed by the European Federation of Crohn’s and Ulcerative Colitis Association, which are available to download free of charge from Crohnscolitis.ie, the specialist clinic developed by Irishhealth.com.

The online guides in the ‘Life and IBD’ series are designed to be personalised so patients can access information appropriate to their life stage and disease severity.  The first guide contains useful information about preparing for visits to the doctor, questions to ask your gastroenterologist and a self-assessment tool to determine the severity of IBD symptoms.

The second guide in the series is in developing an IBD management plan. This gives patients a clear strategy for keeping their IBD symptoms under control.

“The ‘Life and IBD’ programme is a great resource for all people living with Crohn’s disease or colitis, particularly as little information on IBD exists specifically for Irish patients,” said Elizabeth Lattimore, secretary of the Irish Society for Crohn’s and Colitis.

“Depending on the patient’s age and the severity of their condition, educational material can be downloaded that will be relevant specifically to them.  This programme will help to broadly improve quality of life in general in addition to enhancing the clinical management of your disease,” Ms Lattimore added.

In addition to the ‘Life and IBD’ education programme, the website has been updated with a range of new material including a downloadable Rediscover Life newsletter. It also includes expert online video advice, is supported by an educational grant from Abbott. For more, visit http://www.crohnscolitis.ie

[Posted: Mon 26/01/2009]



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