crohn header1 crohn header2 crohn header 3 crohn header 4
Home irishhealth.com Clinics crohns header 5header 5_2
search irishhealth blue blue gradient crohn header 9header 7_1
 
Search Now
pink top
line
     Newly Diagnosed?
line
     Basics
line
     Living with Crohn's
line
     Take Control
line
     Advanced Resources
line
     Patient Manifesto
line
     My Weight Tracker
line
     News Channel
line
     About the ISCC
line
     Questionnaire
line
     Online Video
pink base

Stay informed of site updates:


 
  crohn header 8 header 8_2
What are the symptoms?
crohn header 9
header 9 1

How does Crohn's disease commonly present?
Will children have different symptoms?
Diarrhoea and Crohn's disease
Where is the pain?
Why do symptoms come and go?
Will my symptoms get worse?

How does Crohn's disease commonly present?

The symptoms of Crohn’s disease vary considerably and they may be mild or severe. These include persistent diarrhoea (which can sometimes be bloody), or acute pain or cramps in your abdomen. 

Fever, fatigue and weight loss are also common presenting symptoms. You may experience a loss of appetite.


Will children have different symptoms?

Children with Crohn’s disease may first present with symptoms that seem to be unrelated to their digestive system. They may not be growing properly or they may have pains in their joints that are similar to arthritis.

They may have experienced significant recent weight loss.


Diarrhoea and Crohn's disease

Diarrhoea is one of the most distressing symptoms of Crohn’s disease. Some people may also experience extreme bloating and flatulence (farting) after a meal.

You may need to go to the toilet much more often than a non-sufferer, and for many people this can be one of the most incapacitating and distressing symptoms.

The diarrhoea may come and go or may alternate between bouts of constipation in some cases. In chronic diarrhoea, the consistency of your stools can be very watery and bloody.


pain

Where is the pain?

The most common type of pain is similar in location to a troublesome appendix with pain on your right side. Your pain may go away after you go to the toilet.

Because the severity and location of Crohn’s disease varies so much, the associated pain can also vary considerably. Pain may be very severe or mild, depending on the level of inflammation and where it is.

The pain of Crohn’s disease is usually much more than you might feel if you have a simple upset stomach or indigestion Whether your pain is cramp-like, feels like an ache or is acute will also provide clues to your doctor as to the location of your disease.


Why do symptoms come and go?

The symptoms of Crohn’s often come and go and you might have times when the pain feels unbearable and other times when you think that the illness has gone away for good.

The pain will be less severe or disappear during periods of less active disease. This is often called remission. Sudden onset of pain may indicate your disease may be flaring up again.


Will my symptoms get worse?

Crohn’s disease symptoms may not get worse over time. However, when they do, medical advice is required.

In cases of severe Crohn’s disease, the pain is more acute and the diarrhoea worsens with more trips to the toilet.  Bleeding can become heavy. If the intestine becomes partially or fully blocked, nausea and vomiting are common.


Back to Basics

Back to Homepage

 

line